Heating Float Tanks

Nothing can ruin the mood of floating in an isolation tank faster than feeling cold. It becomes difficult to lose yourself in the moment if your teeth are chattering from the water temperature.

Properly heating your float tank can solve that problem. You have a pair of options in heating your tank. One option is a in-line heating system that incorporates circulation heaters. The second option is installing heating elements directly underneath the tank.

In-line heating systems rapidly raise the water temperature and are efficient in keeping the temperature constant. The only drawback is that these systems can only be run between float sessions because the water must be pumped into heating system and circulated through it before being released into the tank. It limits the amount of time a person can float inside the tank since the water temperature naturally decreases in increments after being heated. In-line systems are best used for floating sessions lasting less than two hours.

Placing a heating element below the tank makes it easier to do floating sessions that last several hours. The heating element will keep the water temperature constant for hours at a time. It is also a less efficient heating method. The heat dissipates through the shell of the float tank instead of heating the water directly. That means a substantial amount of heat is lost in the process.

In-line heating systems offer simpler maintenance than heating elements. They are located outside of the tank in the pump and can be changed or repaired without much trouble. Heating elements, on the other hand, typically require more intensive maintenance. The tanks must be drained and the shell lifted to access the element. It also can be prone to suffering damage from leaks being beneath the water.

Both heating systems have their advantages and disadvantages. The one you choose ultimately depends on how much time you want to spend in the float tank.